|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | USA

US Supreme Court Raises Bar for Police Access to Cell-Phone Location Data

WASHINGTON – The US Supreme Court ruled on Friday in favor of privacy advocates by considering that authorities must in most cases obtain a warrant to obtain users’ location data from cell-phone companies.

By a 5-4 vote, the justices struck down a lower court’s ruling that said the police did not need a warrant to ask a wireless provider to hand over cell phone records in an investigation.

The justices debated whether cell phone records, which include data like users’ locations, are covered by the US Constitution’s Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable search and seizure.

The plaintiff in the case was Timothy Carpenter, who was arrested in April 2011 for several armed robberies in Detroit.

Carpenter was sentenced to 116 years in prison, as he was considered to be the mastermind of a group of thieves and the person responsible for purchasing firearms for the group.

Prosecutors had asked Carpenter’s wireless provider to hand over his cell phone records, which allowed them to follow his location during 127 days and determine that he was near the stores that were robbed.

The Supreme Court ruling, written by Chief Justice John Roberts, sides with Carpenter and declines “to grant the state unrestricted access to a wireless carrier’s database of physical location information.”

According to the ruling, the government will generally need a warrant to obtain cell phone records, although some exceptions are possible, as when a suspect is on the run or is putting others in danger.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved