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  HOME | USA

Taliban Threatens US of More Violence after Trump Rules Out Talks

KABUL – The Taliban threatened the United States on Tuesday of more violence and bloodshed after the latter ruled out peace talks with the rebels following recent attacks in Afghanistan.

The rebels, who have until now systematically rejected the Afghan government’s call for dialogue, said in a statement that US President Donald Trump and his allies have been advocating war and not peace.

“Trump and his pro-war allies should understand, that each action has a reaction, if you are emphasizing on war; then we Mujahid nation also can’t welcome you with flowers,” the statement said.

“Although our enemy only emphasize on war, we believe our nation’s undefeatable resistance and endless patience will finally make the invaders accept the truth and come to the negotiation table,” said Taliban chief Mullah Haibatullah in the statement.

The statement added Afghanistan “has a long history of defeating arrogant invaders,” which is why Trump’s refusal to talks will only “boost the human and material losses of the American military manifold.”

On Monday, during a lunch at the White House with the ambassadors of member countries of the United Nations Security Council, Trump had said there might come a time for talks with the Taliban, but that time was far away.

His comments had followed a suicide attack by the Taliban in Kabul on Saturday, that had killed 103 and wounded 200.

In recent times, the Afghan government has pushed forward a number of talks through the Kabul Process, a peace mechanism it launched along with the UN and the international community, following an attack in May 2017 that had left 150 dead in the Afghan capital.

The Taliban had rejected the Kabul process as well as a G4 peace initiative involving Afghanistan, Pakistan, China and the US.

A few weeks ago, the Afghan government had renewed a rapprochement process with Taliban factions in Turkey, but it was rejected by the rebels.

The Taliban had approached the Afghan government for talks in Pakistan in July 2015, but the process was suspended a few days later, following a decision by the Afghan government to announce the death of Taliban chief Mullah Omar, who had died two years earlier.

The announcement led to an internal power struggle within the Taliban, which split into several warring factions.

Afghanistan is going through one of its bloodiest periods after the end of the NATO combat mission in 2015.

Last August, Trump had announced a new strategy for Afghanistan that included increasing troops to up to 14,000 soldiers and a tough stance toward Pakistan, a country that Washington accuses of sheltering Taliban rebels.

 

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