|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | USA

Hispanics in US Provide Most Care for the Elderly

WASHINGTON – The work of caring for loved ones in the last stage of their life is something the Hispanic community in the United States provides more than any other social group, a story told in the documentary film “Cada Paso en el Camino” (Every Step of the Way).

The way Mexican television personality and activist Marco Antonio Regil dealt with the long illness of his mother is included in the film promoted by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), which premieres this Tuesday.

“Cada Paso en el Camino,” as Regil told EFE in an interview, is a way of letting everyone going through that situation know that “they are not alone,” and that there is “a way they can learn to provide better care for those they love.”

“The first thing to overcome is the lack of information. I didn’t have the least idea she could have mental problems at just over 70 years of age,” Regil said about the diagnosis with Alzheimer’s of his mother, Irma Sanchez, who died last February.

“I kept arguing with my mom, I thought my job was to correct her. It took me years to realize she needed specialized care,” he said.

Regil said that in his case, the best option was to find a place for people with illnesses like hers, where she could do activities appropriate to her needs and be easily visited by her family.

“I had to stop feeling guilty, to stop acting like the father of my own mother and understand I wasn’t doing wrong by taking her to a nursing home. And in doing that I could go back to being her son,” he said.

In a country of 40 million people acting as caregivers, 21 percent of them are Latinos, despite that ethnicity making up only 17 percent of the population, according to AARP estimates. They also invest some 44 percent of their annual income in that work.

“There are beautiful things in our culture, and the most important thing we have is our sense of community,” Regil said about the reasons Latinos tend to spend more time and money taking care of their ill and elderly loved ones.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved