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  HOME | Central America

13 Artifacts from Unknown Civilization in Honduras Restored

TEGUCIGALPA – Thirteen historic artifacts from an unknown civilization have been found and restored by experts in Honduras.

Among the pieces, most of which are ceramics, are vases – one of them adorned with sculpted monkey heads – bowls, miniature jars and grindstones, among others, the assistant manager of the Honduran Anthropology and History Institute (IHAH), Omar Talavera, told EFE.

He said that the pieces were found in February 2017 in Olancho province, some 190 kilometers (118 miles) east of Tegucigalpa, where a hydroelectric construction project financed by China has been under way since 2011.

The pieces were restored by IHAH after it mounted an “archaeological rescue” mission to extract the 13 pieces from the zone, where – as yet – there has been no confirmed information regarding the civilization that crafted them, Talavera said.

In 2009, artifacts had been found by IHAH experts and Mexican archaeologists in the province’s Patuca sector.

Talavera said that in 2017 “some samples” were sent to the US for carbon-14 dating to determine the age of the objects and, hopefully, the civilization from which they came.

According to Honduran media, the pieces date from 1000-1500 AD.

“Certain results are in hand, but we still don’t have a really clear idea of the (societal) group or period to which they belong; that’s still under investigation,” Talavera said.

Honduran expert Lili Castillo – who helped restore the objects – told EFE that the find is important because it represents part of Honduras’ rich “cultural heritage.”

Scientists also found at Patuca about 20 small pieces of jade that could form part of a necklace.

 

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