|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Guatemala Recovered 22 Stolen Archaeological Items Abroad in 2016

GUATEMALA CITY – Guatemalan authorities in 2016 recovered 22 archaeological pieces and fragments that had been stolen from Maya sites and taken abroad, the Culture Ministry announced Tuesday.

The pieces were presented on Tuesday during a ceremony held at the National Palace of Culture and hosted by Guatemalan Culture Minister Jose Luis Chea.

According to the ministry, in February 2016 an archaeological piece seized by Italian authorities was recovered.

That same month, nine pieces, including masks, were turned over to the Guatemalan Embassy in Switzerland.

Meanwhile, last June in Berlin three archaeological pieces were recovered.

In Los Angeles, California, last September, the FBI recovered seven archaeological pieces, including four limestone fragments of a famous Maya stela – Stela 34 – the ministry said.

Stela 34 was found at the Peru Waka archaeological site in northern Peten province. The stela represents a woman identified as Lady K’abel, who is described as a female warlord, and dates from about the year 700.

In October, two panels of a Maya stela were recovered from El Salvador. The fragmentary pieces had been displayed at the Tesak Museum, although their return had been requested through diplomatic channels almost three-and-a-half years ago.

Those two panels are from the Aguacateca and Dos Pilas sites located in Peten, which was the cradle of the Maya civilization.

National Archaeology Museum director Daniel Aquino told EFE that the 22 pieces will be stored at the museum and later incorporated into the permanent cultural heritage exhibition.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved