|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Mayas Perform Ancient Ritual to Bring Peace to Guatemala

GUATEMALA CITY – About 100 people participated on Thursday in an ancient Maya peace ritual, marking the 20th anniversary of the signing of the agreements that ended Guatemala’s 1960-1996 civil war.

Mayan spiritual leaders went to the Kaminal Juyu archaeological site in Guatemala City’s Zone 7 to call for peace, understanding and harmony among the Central American nation’s people.

The leaders, who traveled to the capital from across the country, joined in calling for an end to killings of Indians.

Undersecretary for Peace Rigoberto Casasola, who represented the government at the ceremony, said the 12 peace agreements included recognition of Indians’ identity and rights.

“This is part of the agreements and the Sepaz (Peace Secretariat) supports the ancestral groups from which many of the priests who perform these kinds of ceremonies come. They have a spiritual and Maya content,” Casasola said.

Former President Alvaro Arzu’s administration and the Guatemalan National Revolutionary Unity (URNG) guerrilla group signed the peace agreements ending the nation’s civil war on Dec. 29, 1996, after five years of negotiations.

The peace accords called for extensive reforms designed to limit the military’s role in government, prevent human rights abuses, improve respect for Indian rights, assimilate former combatants into society and improve the judiciary, among other things.

The UN special mission in Guatemala (MINUGUA), which operated until 2002, was responsible for monitoring the peace process and compliance with the peace agreements.

A February 1998 report by the Truth Commission, which investigated human rights violations committed during Guatemala’s 36-year civil war, said 200,000 people were killed and more than 50,000 others disappeared in the conflict.

Some 96 percent of the rights violations, according to the commission, were committed by the army and the rest by leftist guerrillas.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved