|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Experts from Sumitomo and Mitsubishi to Look at Bolivia Lithium

LA PAZ – Japan’s Sumitomo and Mitsubishi will send experts and equipment to Bolivia to support efforts to produce value-added lithium by-products in the Andean nation, state media reported.

Executives from state-run Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation, or Jogmec, signed an agreement here Tuesday on behalf of those two private companies with Bolivia’s Comibol state mining corporation.

Comibol is installing a pilot plant at the Uyuni Salt Flats in southwestern Bolivia that in 2011 will begin producing small quantities of lithium carbonate, the raw material for rechargeable, lithium-ion batteries that power electronic devices and electric vehicles.

“The entire necessary research team (will be sent) to the pilot plant” at Uyuni, the president of Jogmec, Hirobumi Kawano, told the official ABI news agency.

The Bolivian government says the Uyuni Salt Flats, a dried-up sea bed that stretches over a 10,000-square-kilometer (3,860-square-mile) area of the Andean high plains, is the world’s largest reserve of that metal.

Sumitomo and Mitsubishi are two of several companies interested in extracting raw lithium from Uyuni, located in Potosi province, and also producing by-products such as batteries for the rapidly expanding electric car industry.

President Evo Morales says Bolivia does not need foreign partners to produce lithium carbonate but that outside assistance is necessary to install a battery plant near the salt flat.

The president, however, is allowing foreign technicians to contribute to a lithium research committee.

Companies from South Korea, Russia, France and other countries also are interested in partnering with Bolivia to exploit the lithium reserves.

Morales said recently that the only country that has offered to partner with Bolivia on a project to manufacture lithium-ion batteries is Iran, adding that he hopes other countries or companies make similar proposals.

The socialist president, who also has repeatedly stated that potential partners must present plans for factories to manufacture electric vehicles powered by lithium batteries, said last month that merely exporting the metal as a raw material is a recipe for keeping Bolivia poor and underdeveloped. EFE
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved