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  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia Dengue Deaths Increase to 13

LA PAZ -- The number of deaths from hemorrhagic dengue so far this year in Bolivia has increase to 13, the government said Tuesday, while an outbreak of malaria has been detected in three provinces.

National epidemiology director Juan Carlos Arraya told the media that 13 people have now died from hemorrhagic dengue, the most virulent form of the disease, while almost 22,000 cases of ordinary dengue fever have been detected, between possible and confirmed.

Dengue, an infectious disease transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, causes high fevers, headaches, vomiting and skin rashes, and can be deadly in its hemorraghic form, which occurs when a person is infected by the insect for the second time.

Bolivia is suffering its biggest epidemic of the disease for a decade and last week asked for international aid, since it is estimated that $2 million are needed and 500 fumigators to deal with this health emergency.

Arraya also described as "under control" the malaria outbreak detected in the eastern provinces of Beni, Pando and Tarija, regions where, according to the media, there are now more than 300 cases.

"This is within normal limits. In fact malaria has been decreasing systematically over the last three years," the official said.

Malaria is a parasitic disease transmitted by the bite of female Anofeles mosquitos and causes more than a million deaths per year worldwide, some 80 percent of them children, according to data of the World Health Organization. EFE
 

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