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  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivian Government Bids Farewell to Its Home of 165 Years

LA PAZ – President Evo Morales’s administration celebrated on Wednesday its last Cabinet meeting at the La Paz palace, which was the seat of the Bolivian government for 165 years.

“We held the last Cabinet meeting at the Palacio Quemado, symbol of the colonial state,” he posted on Twitter, along with a selfie with cabinet members. “Ready to inaugurate the Great House of the People, as a token of the change and renewal of the new Bolivia we are building.”

At the end of the meeting, Morales had photos taken with journalists on the staircase where he usually talks to reporters.

“When we arrived in the colonial palace, the first thing I saw were symbols of Europe, Rome, Spain... I mean, we respect (them),” he told reporters.

The new offices, to be inaugurated Aug. 9, feature motifs representing the different regions of Bolivia as a “symbol of the Bolivian people, of the plurinational state,” he added.

Morales added that it costs at least $20 million to lease office space for the government departments, which prompted the administration to resolve housing five ministries that currently operate in rented quarters in the building, as well as the presidential office.

The new $34.6-million, 28-story edifice – which was built in 2014 – comes complete with a heliport and is situated right behind the former seat of government, which will be home to a museum.

 

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