|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Newly-Appointed Bolivian Cardinal Comes from Humble Roots

LA PAZ – Newly appointed Bolivian Cardinal Toribio Ticona Porco came from the humblest of origins.

“Many Bolivians did not know him,” one of the priest’s close relatives, who asked to remain anonymous, told EFE. “He has gone unnoticed thus far and now (Bolivians) are getting to know him.”

According to the source, Ticona was born into a family of four children in the Andean region of Potosi in April 1937.

His father, a former combatant in the 1932-1935 Chaco War between with Paraguay, died when Ticona was a young child, forcing him to hold various jobs to help his family, first as a shoeshine boy and then as a newspaper hawker, before working in a mine during his teenage years.

Ticona later met the two Belgian missionaries who founded the Catholic Working Youth (JOC) association at Potosi’s Church of the Immaculate Conception, where he worked as a bell ringer, altar boy and even a Quechua interpreter.

The “people’s priest” – as he was known to locals due to his penchant for helping “miners and peasants” – was ordained at age 30 and in 1992 he became the bishop of Corocoro, located some 100 kilometers (62 miles) south of La Paz and which is a regular waystation and resting point for demonstrators marching to the capital with various demands.

The relative who spoke with EFE also said that the bishop provided “food and shelter” to President Evo Morales – then the leader of the coca growers – during the protest marches he led during the 1990s.

“President Morales surely considers him to be his companion-in-arms,” the source added. “(Ticona) helped him, just like he did any person who needed assistance.”

At a press conference earlier this week, Ticona referred to Morales as a “friend.”

On Oct. 13, 2003, when a military platoon attempted to suppress a march by miners demanding the resignation of then-President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, the priest confronted the soldiers “telling them not to shoot, as they would cause a massacre.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved