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  HOME | Bolivia

World Is Attending Globalization’s Funeral, Bolivian VP Says

LA PAZ – The world is attending the funeral of globalization, once touted as being the “planet’s hope” and a process that is “the most important of this era,” Bolivian Vice President Alvaro Garcia Linera told EFE.

“We are quietly attending a funeral, one that almost no one wants to talk about. It’s the funeral of globalization,” the leftist politician and intellectual said.

Globalization is dead “as an ideology, as hope, as something for the planet to aspire to” based on the desire to achieve well-being via the free market, but not as a “silent and impersonal economic project that continues to make progress in some spaces,” the 54-year-old Garcia Linera said.

“The first signs of the end of globalization were in Latin America with its progressive and revolutionary governments,” the vice president said, adding that these governments were now dealing with a “temporary withdrawal.”

The United States and the United Kingdom, the first standard bearers for the free market and globalization, “are now the ones burying it” with Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union and Donald Trump’s victory in the U.S. presidential election on a protectionist platform, Garcia Linera said.

Bolivia finds itself “in the middle of a world that has lost hope, a world that is seeing a deception die, a collective illusion,” but “it appears before the world with some successful things,” moving from a poor economy to a middle-income one, the vice president said.

Garcia Linera said he was not concerned about the loss of leftist regional allies in Argentina and Brazil, or over the problems in Venezuela, because states act “very pragmatically” when it comes to bilateral relations and trade.

“We may have many ideological differences and even personal animosities between leaders, but in this uncertain world, no one is going to take the risk of isolating themselves from others,” the vice president said.

“Bolivia is seeking to have the best relations possible to protect itself as a country, as a state, in terms of its economy,” Garcia Linera said.

On the ideological front, the Andean nation will continue to be “a small but successful example of what post-neoliberalism is in the time of neoliberalism’s death,” the vice president said.

 

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