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  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivian Survivor of Colombia Airplane Crash Released from Hospital

LA PAZ – Bolivian flight engineer Erwin Tumiri, one of the six survivors of the Lamia airliner that crashed in Colombia, was released on Tuesday from the hospital where he had been admitted after returning to Bolivia last weekend.

Tumiri’s medical exam Tuesday morning established that “he is in satisfactory condition,” for which he was released, Belga Hospital director, Jose Arrieta, told the media.

For his part, the flight engineer said he just wanted to get back to work and “move on” because “it’s something I never want to remember.”

Lamia’s Avro RJ85 airliner crashed last Monday against Cerro Gordo mountain near the municipality of La Union, Antioquia, as it approached the airport that serves Medellin on its way from Santa Cruz de la Sierra in Bolivia.

The airplane crash killed 71 of the 77 people on board, including 19 soccer players, members of the technical staff and managers of Brazil’s Chapecoense soccer club, along with several journalists and crew members.

Only six people survived, five of whom are recovering in medical centers in Medellin, while Tumiri flew to Bolivia in the early hours Saturday after his release from hospital.

In a statement issued on Monday, the Bolivian flight engineer said that neither the pilots nor others of the crew warned passengers about the emergency.

“It all went very fast – from one minute to the next the plane started vibrating, the lights went out and the emergency lights were turned on and that scared us,” he said.

Tumiri, who was sitting at the back of the plane at the time of the crash, made it clear that he is not an employee of the Lamia airline but of another company, and that he was on the flight as a “contracted technician.”

 

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