|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Morales hopes US understands coca policy
LA PAZ (AP) – President Evo Morales on Sunday said he thought the United States will eventually understand his government's polices in the fight against drugs that include maintaining and regulating legal plantations of coca, the raw material in cocaine.


Morales said he and U.S. Ambassador to Bolivia David Greenlee concurred during a nearly two-hour-long meeting Saturday at the Government Palace on the need to eliminate cocaine production.

“At least we agreed on zero cocaine,” said Morales, who was re-elected president of the coca grower's union in the central Chapare region on Tuesday.
The Bolivian leader said he also came away from the meeting confident that Washington will understand his country's need to maintain legal, but regulated, coca production.
“I have realized that (Greenlee) understands perfectly, although he did not say it, that this regulation of coca farming is important,” the Bolivian president said.
One of the most sensitive issues in U.S. relations with Bolivia is the production of coca. Poor Bolivians traditionally chew the leaf to combat hunger and the effects of altitude, and Morales has said he wants to resist coca eradication in Bolivia while cracking down on the international cartels that traffic the plant.
Morales had begun using the term “regulation” to refer to the need to control the farms, not eradicate them.
During Saturday’s meeting, Morales also said that U.S. antidrug agencies will continue operating in Bolivia “if they do not violate human rights.” On Tuesday, the coca growers' union in Chapare voted to demand the exit of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and anti-narcotics officials and any organizations with U.S. funding.
Coca grown in the Chapare is considered illegal, although a temporary agreement struck between coca farmers and former president Carlos Mesa in 2004 allowed each coca-farming family to grow 1,600 square meters (0.4 acres) of coca. Greenlee in the past has reiterated Washington's opposition to the agreement.
Bolivia is the third producer of coca and cocaine in the world, after Colombia and Peru.
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved