|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivia Vice President-Elect Garcia Linera Says Morales To Impose New Tax On Wealthy
LA PAZ -- President-elect Evo Morales plans on imposing a new tax on the wealthy after he takes office in January, his future vice president said Saturday.

Alvaro Garcia Linera's comments come a day after Morales, in a meeting of mining leaders, reaffirmed his commitment to getting rid of Bolivia's free market-oriented economic policy - one of his central campaign promises. He didn't provide details of the proposed changes.

The proposed tax would apply to those with more than $300,000 in property, said Garcia Linera.

He said the tax proposal, which was still being ironed out, would be a top priority for the new government but would differ from the tax hike that sparked protests in 2003 and led to the resignation of President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada.

"We would be crazy to impose the kind of tax that we fought years ago," Garcia Linera said.

The 2003 measure was a progressive income tax whereas the proposed tax would only apply to better-off people.

Economist Carlos Villegas, top adviser for the incoming government, said Bolivia's free market approach has driven up unemployment.

Villegas said Morales' economic team was still formulating its reform plan.

Finance Minister Waldo Gutierrez said Friday that economic conditions were favorable for the new government.

The country's economy is healthy by Bolivian standards, with 2005 gross domestic product growth of 3.9% and similar performance expected in 2006. GDP expanded by 3.6% in 2004 and inflation is forecast to end this year at 4.2%, down from 4.6% last year.

Garcia Linera said that although Bolivia's economic indicators looked good, poverty continued to deepen under the old model.

Morales won recent elections with more popular support than any president since democracy was restored in the Andean nation two decades ago. On Friday he had 53.7% with 99.8% of votes counted. He takes office on Jan. 22. AP


 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved