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  HOME | Cuba

First U.S. Cruise Ship to Sail to Cuba in More Than 50 Years Returns to Miami

MIAMI – The cruise ship Adonia, the first U.S. vessel of its kind to visit Cuba in more than 50 years, returned on Sunday to the Port of Miami after completing a seven-night cruise that made stops in Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago de Cuba.

The vessel operated by Carnival Cruise Line affiliate Fathom docked early Sunday morning at the Miami port terminal with more than 10 passengers ill, presumably with a stomach virus.

A statement issued by the firm confirmed 14 passengers had come down with gastrointestinal illnesses but are recovering.

To prevent the presumed – and highly contagious – “norovirus” from spreading, the crew took special health measures on board the Adonia and the vessel’s medical team ordered passengers to take the required precautions.

The symptoms of norovirus include vomiting, diarrhea, nausea and other stomach problems.

The ship, which can carry more than 700 passengers, set sail from Miami last Sunday and arrived in Havana the next morning, where it was welcomed by hundreds of Cubans.

More than 10 Cubans who left the communist island ove the past five decades – most of them as children – were on board the ship.

Carnival initially adhered to a policy of not accepting travelers of Cuban origin on its cruises to Cuba, in accord with a Cuban law prohibiting its nationals from arriving on the island by sea, a decision that sparked protests by Cuban exiles in Miami and even a civil discrimination lawsuit that was later dropped.

The company, however, modified its stance and announced that the Adonia would sail from Miami without making distinctions between passengers after the island’s government authorized the entry of Cubans by sea.

Fathom will operate a week-long Miami-Cuba cruise twice a month and the voyages will include assorted activities at sea and on land with a cultural, educational and humanitarian component.

 

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