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  HOME | Cuba

Cubans Drop Discrimination Lawsuit against Carnival Cruise Line

MIAMI – A civil lawsuit brought against the Carnival Corporation by two Cubans who felt discriminated against because people born in Cuba were not allowed to travel by sea to the island has been withdrawn, representatives of their attorneys told EFE on Friday.

Attorney Tucker Ronzetti, one of the pro bono representatives of the plaintiffs, Amparo Sanchez and Francisco Marty, said through a spokesperson that they have withdrawn their legal action.

The suit was dropped after Carnival, the leading cruise line in the United States and which is currently organizing trips to Cuba, last week changed its original policy of not accepting Cuban passengers on the affiliate line Fathom that it is inaugurating this Sunday.

Asked if that implied some monetary settlement with the cruise company, a spokesperson told EFE that the lawsuit was all about citizens’ rights and had “nothing to do with money.”

The fact that Carnival initially accepted a Cuban law that barred nationals of that country from arriving by sea sparked a fierce controversy in Miami.

The company reconsidered and announced on April 18 that it would make no distinctions and that passengers of all nationalities were welcome aboard, a decision followed the same day by an announcement by the Cuban government authorizing its citizens to arrive by sea.

The suit’s withdrawal comes on the eve of the first cruise to Cuba by the Fathom company, a Carnival affiliate.

If no last-minute problems arise, the Adonia, with a capacity for 704 passengers, will sail from Miami on Sunday, May 1, on a cruise that calls in at Havana, Cienfuegos and Santiago.

The cruise will begin and end on Sunday and will sail to Cuba every other week.

According to the program, the first two days are dedicated to cultural activities in Havana, the third is one of “cultural immersion” at sea, on the fourth the ship will dock at Cienfuegos where it will remain until the next day, and on the fifth it will arrive at Santiago de Cuba, the last stop on the island.

From Santiago the cruise ship will sail on the sixth day for Miami, where it will arrive on the seventh day.

 

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