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  HOME | Cuba

Dissident Cuban Rapper Comes to U.S. as Political Refugee

MIAMI – Dissident Cuban rapper Angel Yunier Rendon, a.k.a. “El Critico,” who took part in the meeting of U.S. President Barack Obama with members of the opposition in Cuba, is now in Miami as a political refugee.

Yunier, 29, left Cuba on March 31 headed for Miami, where he will live with his wife and son after taking advantage of a program for political exiles in the United States, he told EFE.

Jailed for almost two years in 2013 for the offense of “attacking state security,” the rapper seemed very pessimistic about the possibility of a transition in Cuba as long as “Castro-communism” rules the island.

“Never, never, while there is a Castro regime, will there be a change in human rights. The Cuban government will not change nor will it allow a political opening,” Yunier said categorically.

He said he “didn’t wish to leave Cuba but was forced to leave” by the constant harassment that he and his family suffered on the island, and the pressure of rocks being thrown at him and blackouts in his neighborhood.

“I also come to the United States because of the isolation I’ve been subjected to among the Cuban population, the impossibility of growing as a human being. I can’t work, I don’t have money and my family is suffering,” he said.

Yunier is on the list of the 53 political prisoners freed by the Cuban government following the announcement of the normalization of diplomatic relations between the U.S. and Cuba in December 2014.

In March the rapper took part in the meeting with Obama at the U.S. Embassy in Havana, also attended by leading members of the opposition including Berta Soler, head of the Ladies in White, Guillermo Farińas, Elizardo Sanchez, blogger Miriam Celaya, Manuel Cuesta Morua and more.

 

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