|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Cuba

Cuba Returns to U.S. Missile Mistakenly Received in 2014

HAVANA – Cuba on the weekend returned to the United States a missile received “by mistake” on the island in 2014, with a Cuban team of experts returning it to U.S. territory, the Cuban Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

“Cuba acted with seriousness and transparency and cooperated in order to find a satisfactory solution to this situation,” says the text, adding that the inert air-to-surface missile – a “laser-guided AGM 114 Hellfire rocket” – arrived in the communist nation in June 2014 on a flight from Paris “by mistake or mishandling in the country of shipment.”

The statement says that once the U.S. government officially communicated to Havana its interest in recovering the missile, “the procedures between the two parties (for doing so) were begun,” and the transfer was carried out on Saturday.

Havana insisted that the Lockheed Martin missile “was properly held and taken care of” until the arrival of “a team of experts from the U.S. government and the above-mentioned company who traveled to Cuba to examine (its) condition.”

On Jan. 7, the U.S. press reported that a missile lacking a warhead, initially sent to Spain in 2014 and used in NATO military training exercises, mistakenly wound up in Cuba, instead of returning to its country of origin.

The missile was shipped from Florida to Spain’s Rota naval base and was used in NATO exercises, according to The Wall Street Journal. The daily said that Washington has been asking Havana for more than a year to return the high-tech weapon.

Hellfire missiles are fired from combat aircraft, including helicopters, and were also designed as antitank weapons, but they have been modernized and fired from drones to attack terrorist targets in Yemen and Pakistan.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved