|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Peru

Peruvian Ombud’s Office Calls for Negotiated Solution to Oil Protests

LIMA – The Peruvian Ombud’s Office on Thursday called on the national government to immediately form a commission tasked with negotiating with indigenous leaders in the northern Amazon region of Loreto, where protesters have halted operations at oil block 192 – the country’s largest – and shut down a nearby airfield.

In a statement, it said that commission needs to reach agreement with the Indians on the basic conditions for “a dialogue process” involving Cabinet ministers overseeing areas pertaining to items on the indigenous agenda, the regional government and representatives of local communities.

The national ombud’s office also called on indigenous organizations to refrain from actions that could lead to confrontations among native peoples.

Hundreds of Peruvian Indians have shut down operations at block 192 and the nearby Andoas airfield since Saturday to press demands that the government address their environmental and territorial concerns, an indigenous leader, Carlos Sandi, confirmed in remarks to EFE on Wednesday.

That block, which yields some 11,000 barrels of crude per day, accounts for 17 percent of domestic oil output.

Indians do not oppose oil drilling but they want to “live a healthy life, with water suitable for human consumption, health and education,” Sandi said.

The government on Sunday called on indigenous leaders to end their occupation and reiterated that state-owned oil company Petroperu lacks the financial and technical means to operate the block, despite native communities’ calls for it to do so.

Argentine oil company Pluspetrol operated the block from 2001 until July of this year and was periodically accused by local Indians of polluting their territories and not living up to their environmental remediation obligations.

Peru’s Congress passed a bill earlier this month authorizing Petroperu to develop block 192 despite the vehement opposition of President Ollanta Humala’s administration, which objects to canceling a two-year concession contract awarded in August to Canada’s Pacific Stratus Energy.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved