|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Chile

Anxious Chileans Rush to Buy Food amid Fear of Looting

SANTIAGO – Under tight security, grocery stores briefly opened their doors to shoppers in the Chilean capital Santiago on Monday amid a fear of further looting in a city gripped by protests.

Loaded with bags and shopping carts, residents of the Peñalolen neighborhood in the east of the city rushed to get necessities like diapers, preserves, bread and water.

Dozens of soldiers kept tight security in the premises, which on Sunday was the target of a mob of looters who have been making their way around the capital in three days of protests in the Latin American nation.

The line of people wanting to get inside the building on Monday grew longer and was still present even after soldiers had decided to close the store.

Speaking with Efe after he emerged from the grocery store, a Jumbo outlet, local resident Cristian Praderas, said the atmosphere inside was normal and all kinds of products were on offer.

“They are replenishing everything and it is quiet because there are few people, seeing as they are letting people enter in stages,” he said.

“Having seen yesterday how they tried to plunder this Jumbo, I think (the military presence) is good. Hopefully, we continue with this order, and in the whole country and that we return to normal as soon as possible.”

The soldiers, who were deployed after midnight on Friday after President Sebastian Piñera declared a state of emergency and have monitored the curfew over the last two days, helped the locals load their groceries quickly.

There were similar scenes across the city and some of the lines outside the stores extended several blocks.

On Friday, rioting caught residents of Santiago by surprise when student-led protests against a rise in metro ticket prices descended into violence.

Piñera’s government has already suspended the public transport legislation, but the protests in Santiago and other large cities continued unabated.

The situation on Monday was calmer than on previous days, but the capital was still taking stock of days of violence that left at least 10 dead.

“This was so sudden and nobody expected it so no-one could have thought to have full pantries. It caught us by surprise, so we came, we bought things and protected ourselves. We now have enough for one, two or three weeks,” Praderas said.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved