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  HOME | Chile

Japan, Chile Pledge to Push for Early Implementation of New TPP

TOKYO – Japan and Chile pledged to push for an early implementation of the new Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement, without the United States, during a meeting between the foreign ministers of the two countries in Tokyo on Friday.

Chilean Foreign Minister Heraldo Muñoz and Japan’s Economy Minister and TPP chief Toshimitsu Motegi, expressed their willingness to work together for the implementation of the TPP11, set to be signed by 11 member states on March 6 in Chile, a Japanese Cabinet Office spokesperson told EFE.

Munoz and Motegi met Friday in Tokyo before a bilateral summit between Chile’s President Michelle Bachelet and the Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe during the Chilean delegation’s visit to Japan.

The delegation – whose focus is on trade ties between the two countries – is led by Bachelet and marks her last official visit abroad before the end of her term on March 11.

The original TPP was signed in February 2016 by Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the US and Vietnam.

The agreement, which was on the negotiating table for over six years, had to be ratified within a period of two years by at least six member countries whose combined GDP represented 85 percent of the total.

However, the exit of the US – which alone accounted for 60 percent of the GDP of the 12 signatory states – had put the treaty’s future in jeopardy.

 

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