|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Chile

Chilean Army Said Hiding Information about Former President’s Death

SANTIAGO – The daughter of late former President Eduardo Frei Montalva said Friday that the investigation to determine whether her father was murdered has brought to light the role of the Chilean army in concealing information about the death.

Frei Montalva, who governed from 1964-1970, died Jan. 22, 1982, at a Santiago clinic, ostensibly from an infection that developed after he underwent two operations to alleviate severe acid reflux.

But many suspected that Frei, a Christian Democrat then organizing opposition to the regime of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, was poisoned by agents of the junta’s ruthless secret police.

A decade ago, Frei Montalva’s children, Carmen Frei and Eduardo Frei Ruiz-Tagle, who served as president from 1994-2000, persuaded the courts to open an investigation into their father’s death.

Judge Alejandro Madrid is poised to formally indict six people for the murder of Frei Montalva.

The judge “has given us new reports and the information is truly very significant,” Carmen Frei said Friday in an interview with Radio Cooperativa.

The military continues to hold microfilm records of reports based on wiretapping and surveillance of her father during the 1973-1990 dictatorship, the former senator said.

“We know, from judicial testimony, that this information exists and we want to know where it is,” Carmen Frei said.

Dr. Patricio Silva, a career army physician; Raul Lillo Gutierrez, a civilian who worked for military intelligence; and Luis Becerra Arriagada, one-time chauffeur and aide to Frei Montalva, are accused of direct involvement in the murder.

A physician associated with military intelligence, Pedro Valdivia Soto, faces indictment as an accomplice, while the pathologists who carried out the original autopsy, Helmar Rosenberg and Sergio Gonzalez, are alleged to have covered up the murder.

Judge Madrid declared the death a homicide after Frei Montalva’s remains were exhumed and tests found toxic substances.

One of the physicians facing charges told the judge under oath that he made daily reports to Pinochet’s office about Frei Montalva’s condition, Carmen Frei said.

Pinochet, who died in December 2006 of a heart attack, was never tried for the crimes of his government, which killed more than 3,000 people and tortured some 25,000 others.

The fate of some of those who were “disappeared” during Pinochet’s rule remains unknown to this day.

“It has been a very painful time,” Carmen Frei said. “I will fight to the end, until we know the whole truth, because justice is not only for my family but for the entire country and for all those who don’t know where their loved ones are.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved