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  HOME | Argentina

86-Year-Old Japanese Climber Aborts Mt. Aconcagua due to Medical Reasons

TOKYO – An 86-year-old Japanese mountaineer has aborted his ascent of Argentina’s Mt. Aconcagua due to medical reasons, his family confirmed to EFE on Monday.

On Jan. 18, Yuichiro Miura started his climb up South America’s highest peak (7,000 meters), later reaching a camp located at about 6,000 meters.

The mountaineer stayed two days in the camp waiting for weather conditions to improve so he could attempt the summit. However, he decided to abandon his attempt on the recommendation of a doctor who was part of his expedition.

The doctor told him that a prolonged stay at that height could pose a risk to the health of the octogenarian, who suffers from heart problems, his family said in a press release.

Miura descended to another camp at 5,500m before being evacuated off the mountain by helicopter.

He told his relatives by telephone that he was “convinced he could reach the summit” but decided to cancel the expedition on the doctor’s orders.

He aspired to finish his climb by skiing downhill to one of the base camps located two kilometers below.

In his expedition he was accompanied by a team of six professionals and mountaineering experts, including one doctor, two people in charge of logistics and communications, two cameramen and an assistant, as well as his 59-year-old son, Gota Miura.

In a press conference before his departure to Argentina, Miura said this could be “the last challenge” of his long career, which has taken him to the highest peaks on Earth and included being the oldest person to conquer Mt. Everest at 80 years of age.

 

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