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  HOME | Argentina

Documentary Examines Scourge of Gender-Related Violence in Argentina

BUENOS AIRES – More than 200 women have died thus far this year in Argentina in incidents of gender-related violence, an issue that director Alejandra Perdomo tackles in a documentary film featuring interviews with victims, experts and relatives of slain young females.

That “round and concrete” number has marked a before and after in efforts to combat this scourge and was the genesis for the documentary “Cada 30 horas” (Every 30 Hours), Perdomo said.

The film stems from “daily concerns about opening a newspaper, listening to the radio and television and coming upon news of another femicide” in Argentina, the director told EFE.

She describes the film as “harsh but real” but said it also offers a message of hope by showing that a large number of people are working to improve women’s lives.

The interviewees include domestic violence victims of all ages and social strata, people working every day to combat gender-related violence and the families of slain women who “have been able to transform their pain into struggle.”

Such is the case of the parents of Wanda Taddei, who died after being set on fire in 2010 by her husband, Eduardo Vazquez, a drummer in the Argentine rock band Callejeros who was sentenced to 18 years in prison for the crime.

Taddei’s parents, who form the “backbone of the documentary,” now dedicate all of their energy to helping other women avoid the fate of their daughter, the filmmaker said.

The documentary, which premiered on Nov. 24, is intended as a tool for society and particularly women “immersed in a cycle of violence,” Perdomo added.

 

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