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  HOME | Caribbean

Taiwan President Defiant after Dominican Republic Opens Ties with Beijing

TAIPEI – Taiwan’s President Tsai Ing-wen said on Tuesday that the country would not bow to Beijing’s pressure, after the Dominican Republic ended relations diplomatic ties with Taiwan in favor of China.

Tsai made the remarks, which were shared in a statement by the presidential office, at an unveiling ceremony for the Institute of National Defense and Safety of Foundations.

She urged China to “immediately stop” actions that adversely affect bilateral relations and regional peace.

Taiwan accused China of damaging the “peace and stability” of the region at a time when the Korean peninsula was trying to establish peace through dialogue.

China was increasing its military intimidation and manipulating its “One China” policy to force the island to accept it, its actions had affected “cross-Strait relations,” and were not expected from a “regionally responsible country,” Tsai said.

Taiwan said it was deeply affected by the Dominican Republic’s decision to switch ties to China, but would not bow to Beijing’s pressures and would continue to “stick to national security and safeguard the country’s interests.”

“We will work with friendly nations to uphold regional peace and stability,” the president added.

Opposition lawmakers and experts in Taiwan said China’s diplomatic pressure would continue until Tsai accepts the “1992 Consensus,” a tacit understanding signed by both governments in 1992 that there is just “one China,” but which allowed for different interpretations of its meaning, although the current government of Taiwan disputes this.

“It is unlikely that China would stop snatching away Taiwan’s allies until there is a change in the president’s posture,” Elisa Wang, a professor at the Institute of Latin American Studies, Tamkang University, told EFE.

Taiwan is now left with just 19 diplomatic allies, 10 of them in Latin America and the Caribbean.

 

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