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  HOME | Caribbean

Haiti Needs $900 Million to Improve Sanitation, Potable Water

PORT-AU-PRINCE – The head of Haiti’s Water Supply and Sanitation Directorate, or Dinepa, said on Tuesday that the country needs as much at $900 million to build infrastructure to improve potable water and sewage services in the capital.

Access to clean water is a big problem in the impoverished country and much of its infrastructure is obsolete or has been vandalized, but even so Dinepa chief Benito Dumay said that he is “very happy” with the advances being made in the area.

“We’re going in a good direction. Although we need more funds, I’m very pleased with the technical assistance we’re receiving from the Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID) and the Inter-American Development Bank,” Dumay emphasized.

Last week, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries announced $160 million in aid to finance potable water and sanitation projects in Haiti, while the IDB and AECID reported that they will contribute $65 million to Dinepa.

“I’m very happy and we’re going to keep working to satisfy the demands of the public,” the official said.

The public health situation in Haiti has been in critical shape since the cholera outbreak after the disease was introduced to the country by UN peacekeepers, an epidemic that has taken the lives of thousands and continues to ravage the country.

 

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