|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

“Anti-Monuments” Commemorating Tragedies Flourish in Mexico City

MEXICO CITY – Ordinary people are changing the face of Mexico City with projects, known as “anti-monuments,” that are meant to keep alive the memory of tragedies that have shaken the country.

The first to appear, in Spring 2015, was a figure “+ 43” erected on the emblematic Mexico City thoroughfare of Paseo de la Reforma by family and friends of the 43 young people abducted in September 2014 in the southern state of Guerrero.

Presumed dead, the students from Ayotzinapa teachers college have never been found and the official account of their disappearance has been roundly rejected by their families, as well as by independent experts and investigators who reviewed the case.

Municipal authorities allowed the unofficial Ayotzinapa memorial to remain and the + 43 has been joined by other anti-monuments.

Mexico City’s giant main square, the Zocalo, is home to the newest creation: a memorial to the hundreds who died here in October 1968 in a massacre of student protesters.

Outside the Mexico City stock market stands a giant “+ 65” that represents the 65 workers killed in a 2006 mine explosion in the northern state of Coahuila.

The anti-monuments serve the purpose of making people think, passerby Osvaldo Oliva told EFE near the miners’ memorial.

“There are many people who visit these places, domestic and foreign tourists, and they wonder what it means. They give visibility to the problems,” he said.

Roughly a kilometer (0.6mi) away from the stock market is the headquarters of Mexico’s IMSS social-security agency, where activists have raised an anti-monument to 49 children who died nearly a decade ago in a fire at a daycare center in the northern state of Sonora.

Society “is making its voice heard,” photographer Hector Crispin Gonzalez said of the anti-monuments.

“Before, things happened, they were discussed at home and they did not go beyond that,” he told EFE. “Now, society is organizing.”

Mexican authorities catalogued more than 25,000 homicides in 2017 and this year’s total is expected to be higher.

In the face of those numbers, people can become desensitized and lose empathy, historian Roberto Jimenez told EFE, making it all the more important “that society itself participate in the demand for justice.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved