|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Brazil Metal Workers Protest against Labor-Law Overhaul

SAO PAULO – Brazilian metal workers protested Thursday in several cities against a labor-law overhaul that President Michel Temer’s administration strongly backed and Congress passed earlier this year.

Between 200 and 300 people gathered in downtown Sao Paulo to express their rejection of the changes and defend their rights.

The metal workers’ unions had called for a “National Day of Struggle” against the overhaul, but there was little support for the protests nationwide and the demonstration in Sao Paulo mobilized smaller numbers of people than usual.

Signed by Temer in July and due to take effect in 120 days, the changes to legislation dating back to the 1940s were aimed at making rules on hiring and terms of employment more flexible.

The new rules lend legal legitimacy to contracts reached by companies and workers via collective bargaining, making them valid even if they contradict some aspects of the labor code providing strict workers’ rights protections.

Among other changes, companies will have flexibility in terms of reducing the lunch break through collective bargaining and dividing up vacation time.

In addition, according to the Sao Paulo-based Demarest Advogados law firm, hours incurred by the employee when using employer-offered transportation are no longer treated as part of the employees’ working schedule and companies are no longer required to negotiate mass lay-offs with workers’ unions.

The labor-law changes were part of packet of fiscal measures Temer’s government proposed to bring down a high budget deficit and get the economy moving after two years of recession.

Brazil’s economy has experienced a mild recovery this year after contracting by 3.8 percent and by 3.6 percent in 2015 and 2016, respectively, with gross domestic product (GDP) expanding by 1 percent in the first quarter and by 0.2 percent between April and June.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved