|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Mexican Scientists Working to Save Bats to Protect Pollination Network

MEXICO CITY – Mexican scientists are conducting conservation work with bats so that the flying mammals can continue contributing to the vital process of pollination, the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) reported on Thursday.

In a communique, the research institute – one of the country’s most prestigious such facilities – said that some bat species contribute to pollination, help control insect pests and help disperse seeds, according to ongoing studies.

According to Mexico’s National Autonomous University (UNAM), 75 percent of the foods consumed by humans depend entirely on pollination to reproduce and grow.

IPN research is evaluating the ecological and conservation needs of the Leptonycteris yerbabuenae bat species, popularly known as the lesser long-nosed bat.

The study titled “Tracking Bats for Conservation: Cooperative Study on the Foraging Behavior of Tube-lipped Bats” is analyzing the movements of these migratory animals.

Via the study, scientists are obtaining valuable data for improving their ability to preserve and protect the species.

For the past year, the scientists have been working in the town of Techaluta de Montenegro, in Jalisco state, and in the community of Cacachilas, in Baja California Sur.

They are attempting to capture 24 male bats – 12 individuals at each site – onto which they will install GPS transmitters to register their movements while they are out hunting for food.

Veronica Zamora, a scientist with the Interdisciplinary Research Center for Comprehensive Regional Development (CIIDIR), said that in Mexico there are 138 different types of bats.

Of those, just three feed on the blood of farm animals or livestock.

“The rest of the bats are our allies, since we benefit from their existence,” she emphasized.

Zamora, who is also a professor at Mexico’s National Science and Technology Council (Conacyt), was speaking about the migratory bats that feed on nectar, which she said are vulnerable to climate change, given that environmental shifts can affect the availability of seasonal floral resources.

Besides climate change, deforestation and pesticides have affected the habitat of bats.

“In a publication, we conclude that 50 percent of the (bat) species in Mexico are facing a severe threat in combination with climate change and land use,” she said.

In addition, mining activity is another huge problem to overcome in saving the bats, since the sites where such activity is carried out – caves and caverns – are where many bat species reproduce and hibernate.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved