|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Rhino Poaching Deaths in South Africa Down 25% in 2018

JOHANNESBURG – The World Wildlife Fund warned that although South Africa had managed to bring down rhino deaths due to poaching by 25 percent in 2018, the animals were still endangered and the crisis engulfing them was far from over.

Figures released via South Africa’s Department of Environmental Affairs, as cited by the WWF in a statement, showed 769 rhinos were killed last year compared to 1,028 in 2017.

“The fact that fewer rhinos have been lost in South Africa in 2018 is good news and merits credit for the hard work and commitment of all those involved,” doctor Jo Shaw, African Rhino Lead for WWF International, said in a statement.

“In spite of lower poaching numbers for 2018, the crisis for rhinos is far from over and it is important to consider the number of live rhinos remaining as well as the number of poaching losses,” the WWF report said.

It was the first time in five years that the number of rhinos killed had dropped below 1,000.

Kruger National Park in the northeast is one of South Africa’s main natural reserves, and it is home to the majority of the country’s rhino population.

Fewer rhinos were killed in the park last year than the previous year – 421 in 2018 versus 504 in 2017 – but it was still the area where most of the killings happened.

The WWF said 229 alleged poachers were arrested last year in or near the park, 40 more suspects on the previous year.

Kruger was also the scene of 71 elephant killings at the hands of poachers in 2018, according to the organization.

The country has a population of about 5,000-5,400 black rhinos, which the WWF lists as “critically endangered,” and between 19,600-21,000 white rhinos, listed as “near threatened.”

“The overall status of our rhino populations remains a concern and we need continued commitment to address the systemic challenges for rhinos across the region,” said Shaw.

South Africa has been fighting a serious escalation of poaching since 2008.

Poachers hunt the animals for their horns, which are then sold mostly on Asian markets.

Rhino horns are used in traditional Chinese medicine where they are mistakenly believed to have aphrodisiac and healing properties.

“Whilst 2018 saw some major arrests and successful convictions, the frequent granting of bail, especially to those in the crime syndicates co-ordinating rhino horn trafficking, is a serious concern,” WWF warned.

“We need targeted efforts to address corruption and more effective international collaboration on investigations into syndicates operating in Asia to address the entire criminal supply chain,” it added.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved