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  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Homeward Bound Banks on Global Network of Women Working for the Planet

USHUAIA, Argentina – After the successful expedition to Antarctica by 80 female scientific and technical leaders of the Homeward Bound program, the Australian Fabian Dattner, founder of the project, said in an interview with EFE that she was more committed than ever to creating a global network of women to boost their influence and visibility on the planet.

“The most important goal for Homeward Bound is bringing together the number of 1,000 women by 2026,” Dattner said, adding that with this network she seeks to increase women’s impact on global issues like climate change.

“Can you imagine a whole tapestry of connections around the planet, all in favor of that goal?” Dattner said, noting that the project, which is supported by Spanish infrastructure and renewable energy company Acciona, is aimed at women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Medicine (STEMM).

The program, whose annual closure is held in Antarctica and in which women from about 30 nations take part, gives the participants the tools to analyze their personalities and leadership styles in order to use them to achieve their various goals.

“The achievements are on three different levels: first, they feel capable of leading; number two, they realize that together they are stronger; and third, they are visible and have an impact on the world,” Dattner said.

As part of this program, this year 80 scientific and technical leaders from around the world traveled to Antarctica for 20 days, from where they returned this Saturday to the Argentine city of Ushuaia after a successful tour.

This third Homeward Bound expedition left on Dec. 31 from Ushuaia, considered the southernmost city on the planet, and among its stops in the Antarctic were Argentina’s Carlini Base, the US Palmer Station and Paulet Island, with its breeding colony of thousands of Adelie penguins.

Taking part in the tour was the Costa Rican Christiana Figueres, known for her role in the Paris Agreement on climate change and a leader of women’s empowerment.

 

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