|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Women Scientists in Antarctica Keep Studying While Unable to Make Landfall

ABOARD THE MV USHUAIA, Antarctica – The 80 prominent women in science, engineering and medicine of the 2019 Homeward Bound expedition to Antarctica have gone three days with their ship unable to make landfall due to the ice formations, and have been filling the hours with sessions on leadership, zumba, yoga and even knitting.

On the 11th day of the expedition, and following an unsuccessful try at visiting the United States’ Palmer Station, were two failed attempts to reach Vernadsky, the Ukrainian research station in the Antarctic.

“What caused the problem were small chunks of ice from the glaciers that are very difficult to see and a danger to the ship. Besides, the coast of the Ukrainian station was surrounded by old ice, which is extremely compact, very hard and makes a landing impossible,” Sergio Osiroff, skipper of the Ushuaia, told EFE.

The expedition set off from the Argentine city of Ushuaia as part of Homeward Bound, an initiative supported by Spanish infrastructure and renewable energy firm Acciona to boost the visibility of women in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine) as leaders on matters of global import.

Two days ago, when the landing at Palmer was prevented by ice, station chief Bob Farrell and nine members of the staff went out to the ship to talk about the numerous research projects underway there.

After the landings were called off, the passengers have spent entire days training in leadership, improving teamwork and boosting women’s visibility, as well as doing presentations on the way each of them has a positive influence on the world.

Li Wang, Binbin Wang, Anisha Humphreys, Tara Shine, Sarah Johns, Stephanie Langerock and Carolina Garcia are some who took part in the sessions.

Binbin Wang moved the others deeply when she spoke about the impact of feminine leadership on the opening of China, while Langerock, senior international relations officer at the Belgian Federal Public Service for Public Health, Food Chain Safety and Environment, spoke amid tears of the struggle, often frustrating, for the protection of whales.

Other activities on the program were yoga, aerobics and improvisational theater, the latter with the goal of strengthening the capacity for listening that is so necessary in a good leader.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved