|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Global Warming Threatens Green Sea Turtles to Become All Females, Study Says

MADRID – Global warming has the most varied effects and some are surprising, such as the “feminization” of the green sea turtle, as a study suggests that by 2100 up to 93 percent of the hatchlings of this species could be females.

The sex of turtle hatchlings is determined by temperature and, currently, approximately 52 percent of green sea turtles (one of the seven species of marine turtles) are females, according to a study published in the Global Change Biology journal on Wednesday.

The study by the British University of Exeter and the Portuguese Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre indicates that with the scenario of warmer temperatures predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), between 76 and 93 percent of the offspring of those sea turtles would be females.

The data refers specifically to the Bijagos archipelago in Guinea-Bissau, but researchers expect “a similar picture globally,” according to a statement from the University of Exeter.

The change in the proportion of gender would initially lead to a larger number of females nesting, increasing the population, before a decrease “as incubation temperatures approach lethal levels.”

In addition, on the beaches where the study was conducted, experts predict that rising sea levels will submerge from 33 to 43 percent of the areas where the green turtles nest.

One of the authors of the study, Rita Patricio, of the University of Exeter, warned that the green turtles are “will have to face problems in the future due to the loss of its habitat and the increase in temperatures.”

However, cooler temperatures, both at the end of the nesting season and in some shaded areas, will ensure that some hatchlings are male, she added.

Bijagos is the most important nesting area of the green sea turtles in Africa.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved