|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

European Grey Wolf Population Rising Year on Year in Germany

MORITZBURG WILDLIFE PARK, Germany – The German wolf population continues to grow year on year, as documented by an epa-efe photojournalist who visited a wildlife park in the east of the country on Tuesday.

According to data compiled by the German Federal Nature Preservation Office (BfN), the population of European grey wolves is rising, with 73 confirmed packs, 13 more than recorded last year, and 30 pairs, 11 more than 2017 records suggest.

“The ongoing positive development of the wolf population in Germany stands in strong contrast to the worldwide dramatic loss of biodiversity,” said BfN president Beate Jessel.

The native European species has witnessed a steady decline since the Middle Ages (5-15th centuries) thanks to an institutionalized effort to cull the population deemed an annoyance to farmers.

By the 19th century, most European wolves had been exterminated in Scandinavian countries, central European states and entirely extinct in England.

In 1934, Nazi Germany introduced a bill to protect the animals. Since then, wolf packs have steadily grown in number primarily in Germany’s eastern and central states and continue to flourish thanks to continuing monitoring campaigns and legislation to manage the canine population.

The European grey wolf varies in size depending on its geographic habitat, and on average is between 1.3-1.8 meters long (4.5-6 feet) and weighs between 22-49 kilograms (50-110 pounds).

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved