|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Australian Researchers Develop Tiny Alternative to Open Brain Surgery

SYDNEY – Researchers in Australia have developed a tiny device that generates electrical stimuli in the brain and that could contribute to the treatment of epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease, academic sources reported Tuesday.

The device, called a Stentrode, is four millimeters in diameter and is implanted without the need for invasive surgery through a small keyhole incision in the neck into a blood vessel adjacent to the brain’s motor cortex to emit localized stimuli.

The research involved several medical and academic institutions and a Melbourne-based company and has now shown the device can not only listen to brain signals but also talk back, to directly target specific areas of the brain.

It’s the first time this type of brain stimulation has been achieved with a device permanently implanted inside a blood vessel, instead of through invasive direct brain stimulation, a statement from the University of Melbourne said.

This technology opens the door to treatments for diseases such as epilepsy and Parkinson’s as well as mental illnesses such as major depression and spinal cord injuries.

“We can now target both the motor cortex (responsible for planning, control and execution of movements) and the sensory cortex (which receives feedback about actions) with one device,” said lead researcher Dr Nick Opie from the University of Melbourne’s Vascular Bionics Laboratory.

“This means we could, for example, help spinal cord patients use a prosthetic arm by commanding it to grab an item, and then providing feedback on that action so they don’t grab it too hard or too soft.”

Next, the team will investigate stimulation parameters before progression to human trials.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved