|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Mexico Creates Biodiversity Bank amid Natural Disaster, Climate Change Fears

GUADALAJARA, Mexico – Scientists with the National Center for Genetic Resources (CNRG), in the western Mexican state of Jalisco, are working to preserve the germoplasm of thousands of species in an effort to protect the country’s biodiversity from future natural catastrophes.

By collecting and preserving the genetic resources for later use, the institution aims to safeguard an assortment of species from the depletion of their natural ecosystems using a variety of techniques.

Researcher Esmeralda Cruz told EFE that the center – one of the world’s nine most important labs of its kind – is the only one in all Latin America that keeps samples of forestry, livestock, microbial, and aquatic germplasm.

“We preserve material from all these subsystems important to humans,” the agricultural engineer said, adding that the center’s goal is to store the material so that it may be used to improve the conditions of a given ecosystem, as well as to rescue endangered species in the future.

Samples from all over the country arrive at the center, where they are classified and preserved depending on the needs of each particular sample.

The material is then studied at the center’s DNA and genomics laboratory.

CNRG director Ramon Arteaga told EFE that the center aims to protect the samples through the use of a variety of methods that allow to safeguard the materials without modifying or changing their genetic structure, preserving them for “at least 10 years.”

The collected samples, such as orthodox seeds – which are able to survive in both dry and cold conditions – are put in cold storage under sub-zero temperatures, while recalcitrant seeds are stored in test tubes under specific conditions, as they are not able to survive abrupt changes in temperature.

Microbial and aquatic samples, on the other hand, are stored in nitrogen tanks, which can hold as many as 6,000 test tubes.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved