|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Launch of SpaceX Rocket Carrying Spanish PAZ Satellite Delayed

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, California – Wednesday’s scheduled launch of the Spanish earth-observation satellite PAZ atop a SpaceX rocket was postponed due to weather conditions.

“The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the PAZ satellite from Space Launch Complex-4, is delayed today due to upper level winds,” said a message posted on the Vandenberg Air Force Base Web site. “The launch is rescheduled for Thursday, Feb. 22, at 6:17 a.m. PST (1417 GMT).”

The PAZ satellite is a device carrying radar technology for both military and civilian use.

This is the fifth time the launch has been postponed.

First set for Jan. 30, the launch was put off to Feb. 10, only to be postponed again to Feb. 17, and then to Feb. 18. Hisdesat, the satellite owner-operator, said that last weekend’s delays were because of technical issues and the need to carry out additional tests on the SpaceX rocket.

Possible applications of the PAZ satellite include intelligence gathering; cartography; border monitoring; assessing natural disasters; zoning and planning; and environmental observation.

PAZ will produce up to 100 high-resolution images every day. Thanks to its radar technology, these images can be taken at any time, as there is no need for sunlight or ideal weather conditions.

The satellite weighs some 1,400 kg (3,086.5 lbs) and is five meters (16.4 ft) high and 2.4 meters wide.

PAZ is configured to orbit Earth 15 times a day at an altitude of 514 km (319.4 mi).

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved