|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Chile Observatory Gains New Tool in Search for Extraterrestrials

SANTIAGO – Chile’s Paranal Observatory is preparing for the debut of Espresso, a cutting-edge spectrograph that will aid in detection of small, Earth-like planets capable of sustaining life, astronomer Gaspare Lo Curto said on Friday.

Espresso – the Echelle SPectrograph for Rocky Exoplanet and Stable Spectroscopic Observations – is currently in the test phase and is expected to be fully operational by October, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) scientist said.

Finding planets with conditions similar to Earth is crucial to the goal of discovering extraterrestrial life, Lo Curto said.

One of the innovations of Espresso is the capacity to collect light simultaneously from all four Unit Telescopes of Paranal’s VLT (Very Large Telescope) array.

Espresso could be a milestone in astronomical observation, as it will allow scientists to detect exoplanets – planets orbiting stars other than the Sun – with unprecedented precision, making it easier to identify Earth-like planets.

The new instrument will permit scientists to obtain information about an exoplanet, such as whether the atmosphere contains oxygen, carbon dioxide and water, three elements that are necessary for life, Lo Curto said.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved