|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Most Marine Mammal Deaths in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula Linked to Humans

MEXICO CITY – The leading cause of death for marine mammals that beach themselves in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula is contact with humans, National Science and Technology Council (CONACYT) officials said Tuesday.

“The majority die because they get caught in fishing nets and, as mammals, they cannot surface to breathe, eventually drowning,” CONACYT Yucatan Marine Mammal Research and Conservation Program director Raul Diaz said.

Fishermen leave nets and other traps in areas that are home to dolphins, which can be attracted by bait.

“If there are fish there, the dolphins may eat them, not knowing that there is a net and getting trapped, becoming more entangled as they try to get out and drowning,” Diaz said.

Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), the most common porpoise in the waters around the Yucatan Peninsula, is the species found beached most often.

Among the other marine mammals found beached on the Yucatan’s beaches were pygmy sperm whales (Kogia breviceps), rough-toothed dolphins (Steno bredanensis) and bridled dolphins (Stenella attenuata).

In 2016, marking a first, a finback whale (Balaenoptera physalus) beached itself in the Yucatan.

The number of beached marine mammals in the Yucatan has ranged from 10 in 2013 to one in 2015.

More than 20 marine mammals beached themselves in 2016, while around 15 did so in 2017.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved