|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Mexico’s Espiritu Santo Archipelago: A Treasure Trove of Biodiversity



LA PAZ, Mexico – The Espiritu Santo archipelago in the northwestern Mexican state of Baja California Sur is a protected area that captivates visitors for its rich biodiversity, a feature that makes it one of the jewels of the Gulf of California known as “the world’s aquarium.”

The park is being visited by a growing number of people every year, mainly tourists, who take advantage of the chance to dive, snorkel, sail, relax with sport fishing and soak up the scenery.

The Espiritu Santo Archipelago national park has more than 200 species of plants and 70 of animals.

“It’s an example of conservation on the world level. Not because we say it, but because we’re adhering to all the standards of the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nataure), which bestows an award for the good management of ecosystems,” park director Irma Gonzalez told EFE.

The Gulf of California, with its more than 900 islands and islets of volcanic origin, is known as “the world’s aquarium” because practically all species of turtles, whales and fish are found there, along with a large number of bird species, Gonzalez said, adding that it is possible to conserve them because there are many protected areas in the region, including the Espiritu Santo archipelago.

The archipelago has been protected by law since 2007, and among the marine species to be found there are seals, hammerhead sharks and manta rays.

“In 10 years, we’ve made many important achievements, like getting the seal colony to have better reproductive success with 550 individuals in perfect health,” said Gonzalez, who also emphasized the large nesting areas for pelicans and seagulls.

The archipelago is also a site of tourist interest because of its isolation, volcanic origin, scenic beauty and stark contrasts between sea and desert.

To get to the park, visitors need to travel 25 kilometers (16 miles) by boat from the state capital of La Paz. The archipelago – which covers 105 square km (about 40 square mi.) – consists of two main islands, La Partida and Espiritu Santo, along with three islets and four rocky promontories.

There are some 20 beaches where visitors can relax, sail or pursue other leisure activities.

The rocks in the park were formed before the separation of the Baja California peninsula from the mainland, according to what Javier Gaitan, a research geologist with the Autonomous University of Baja California Sur, told EFE.

“Many of the rocky formations reveal the geologic history of the zone and are of great interest from a scientific point of view,” he added.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved