|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Biggest Dinosaur Ever Found in Argentina
100 Tons!

BUENOS AIRES – A farm worker in Argentina discovered the remains of a dinosaur weighing 100 tons, which makes it the largest specimen in the world found up to now according to researchers’ calculations, local media reported Saturday.

The object found was the femur of a herbivorous dinosaur of the sauropod family that lived some 100 million years ago, and was found in the southern Argentine province of Chubut near the town of Las Plumas.

The bone “is equivalent to those of 14 African elephants, from which it is deduced that the animal weighed at least 100 tons,” researcher Pablo Puerta of Chubut’s Egidio Feruglio Paleontological Museum said in a statement to the official news agency Telam.

The discovery, presented Friday to the media, was made more than three months ago, since when museum researchers have been working on its recovery.

This is the second dinosaur find reported in Argentina this week, after the National Scientific and Technical Research Council, or CONICET, presented the remains of a diplodocid sauropod that scientists place as the first of its species to be found in South America and the only one in the world from the Cretaceous Period.


Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:




 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved