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  HOME | Society (Click here for more)

Prince Harry, Meghan Yet to Announce New Baby’s Name

LONDON – The United Kingdom’s Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle have not yet announced the name of their newborn son, but Alexander, James and Arthur are in the running as the bookmakers’ favorites.

The royal couple spent Tuesday in private after the Duchess of Sussex, 37, gave birth to the couple’s first child on Monday.

The arrival of another baby to the royal family has attracted much media attention in the UK and abroad, with the main focus on the town of Windsor, where well-wishers have been leaving all kinds of mementos, such as including flowers, flags and teddy bears, near the castle.

In London, the easel outside Buckingham Palace announced the royal birth and BT’s telecommunications tower carried the message: “It’s a boy!”

While the world awaits the announcement of the name of the child, who has been dubbed “Baby Sussex” by the media, bookmakers have earmarked Alexander, James and Arthur as favorites.

Spencer, Phillip, Charles, Edward and Oliver were also being floated as possible baby names.

Unlike the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Harry and Meghan opted not to appear in public with their baby on the day of his birth, a sign perhaps that they want to protect their privacy and stave off a large deployment of photographers.

It is not yet clear if the couple will release a photo of the child or if they will appear as a family in front of television cameras, amid great interest in the latest addition to the royal family.

Weighing 3.3 kilograms, the “little thing is absolutely to-die-for,” Prince Harry said Monday when he announced the birth.

The boy will not automatically adopt the title of “prince,” but he may become known as the “Earl of Dumbarton,” a title that Queen Elizabeth II, Harry’s grandmother, granted to him on his wedding day in May 2018.

Under a rule established under King George V (1865-1936) in 1917, the use of titles like “royal highness,” “prince” and “princess” are reserved exclusively for the children of the sovereign and her grandchildren, as well as those who are high up in the line of succession.

The new royal is seventh in line to the throne.

However, the Queen could intervene, as she did in 2012 when she ruled all the children of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince William and Catherine, would hold prince and princess titles.

As the Duke and Duchess of Sussex want to show themselves as close to the people and have been keen to shed traditions seen by many as archaic, media outlets have not ruled out that they will renounce their son’s “prince” title.

The newborn, believed to be the first mixed-race child born into the royal family, is the seventh in line to the British throne after his father harry, his three cousins George, Charlotte and Louis, his uncle Prince William and his grandfather Prince Charles.

He is also the eighth great-grandchild of the Queen, who turned 93 last month and has spent 67 years on the throne.

 

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