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  HOME | Opinion (Click here for more)

TalCual: Military Silence in Venezuela
It turns out that we are now carrying an economic noose around our necks after Maduro decided to increase, quite succulently we must say, the military salaries and allow them to accumulate debt up to Bs.37 billion so they can buy more weapons next year, without forgetting the fair amount of men in uniform who are well-connected to the governmental bureaucracy.

By TalCual

It turns out that we are now carrying an economic noose around our necks after President Nicolás Maduro decided to increase, quite succulently we must say, the military salaries and allow them to accumulate debt up to Bs.37 billion so they can buy more weapons next year, without forgetting the fair amount of men in uniform who are well-connected to the governmental bureaucracy.

The only explanation one could think of is that he wants to keep the military away from having bad thoughts on all the calamities that are smashing us all at present.

Although it is true we are in the middle of a war, an issue the men in uniform should have a primary voice in. But what happens here is that this armed conflict is quite special since we have not been able to identify the enemy yet or, in other words, enemies are so many and varied that it turns difficult to bring some order to those battalions threatening the Homeland.

Anyhow, it is quite enigmatic the kind of weapons they use since these are not tanks or planes, and nothing related to them, but inflation, shortages, crime, corruption, power outages, rumors, media messages, “cadivism” and things of that nature.

This all without considering that, by using simply common sense, it seems that so much devastation such as that we currently suffer is the result of wrong policies from the same political regime over the past fifteen years. Something that would bring the much-paradoxical outcome, perhaps unique in the history of this country, of a government that has declared war on itself.

We just wanted to ask ourselves a couple of questions about this apparent happy relationship between the Executive and the Army. In parallel with these generosities, Maduro has pledged 500,000 officers for the militias and a million (sic) by the time he finishes his presidential term.

Since these forces are cut out to defend the Homeland, what the Revolution really wants to say with this, meaning both the Government and the PSUV party, is that it would be interesting to find out what the Armed Forces comprised by only 100,000 officers think about such a numerous, little trained and hardly controllable parallel army.

Now, the second issue is more specific.

A few days ago, a scandalous decree was published on the country’s Official Gazette, some kind of anti-constitutional body that would become some sort of controlling entity of national defense against internal and external enemies, one that was to collect, sort out and provide information to a “ghostly” political-military Office from the Revolution presided over military hands.

Some analysts saw this as some sort of “cold coup,” a reduction of power from a subordinate Executive, in essential aspects, of that powerful machine. A few days later, a different version from the original decree was published in the Gazette stating that there are no longer either internal enemies (meaning the Venezuelan opposition) or external enemies, reports must now be made to the Presidency rather than the Military Office and public bodies and persons are released from the duty of making reports to the fledgling entity known as Cesppa.

Lastly, and this is not a small detail, the president of Cesppa now becomes the director of the body. What was the problem here? Who was the corrector and who got corrected? According to some concerned analysts, it was one of the justices from the Supreme Court who dotted the i’s and crossed the t’s. Others are talking about the reactions at national and international level in the wake of the creation of this offspring of military nature.

Yet, one always has its own doubts on the case. What is going on at the Armed Forces has the features of a black box most of the time. Perhaps this was about a different kind of struggle between the State and the Army.




 

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