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  HOME | Oil, Mining & Energy (Click here for more)

Japan Pushes to Reduce Plutonium Reserves in New Energy Plan

TOKYO – Japan approved on Tuesday a new energy plan in which it intends to cut its plutonium reserves for the first time, and aims to have renewables account for 22 to 24 percent of its electricity generation by the year 2030.

The Asian country has vowed to try to reduce its plutonium reserves to contribute to nuclear non-proliferation, according to the text released by the Ministry for Economy, Trade and Industry.

The government, which updates the energy plan nearly every three years, targets to have renewables account for 22-24 percent of its electricity production by 2030, and called for support for the development of wind, solar and geothermal energy.

Japan also seeks to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels until it falls to 56 percent by 2030.

It also hopes to reduce its dependence on nuclear power generation as much as possible, to between 20-22 percent, although it acknowledges that it is a viable alternative to the use of coal and other fossil fuels.

Japan, a signatory of the Paris agreement on climate change, is also seeking to accelerate its efforts to fight global warming, and has set the goal of achieving an 80 percent cut in greenhouse gas emissions from 2013 levels by 2050.

The Japanese archipelago, with an energy self-sufficiency index that stood at 8.3 percent in 2016, according to the latest government data released in May, has few resources and needs to ensure stable energy supplies that mostly come from fossil fuels, which accounted for 89 percent during that year.

Japan earlier made large investments in nuclear energy, but the Fukushima Daiichi plant accident in 2011 led to a two-year atomic blackout and currently only 7 of the country’s 42 reactors are operational.

 

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