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  HOME | Oil, Mining & Energy (Click here for more)

Mexican Expert Warns of Renewable Energy Limitations

MEXICO CITY – The massive use of fossil fuels has led humans to an “energy abyss,” which will not be easily remedied due to the limitations of renewable energies, expert Edgar Ocampo said on Friday at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM).

Ocampo, a UNAM researcher, said during a conference that the technical and physical limitations of renewable energies will make it hard to solve the problem of the depletion of natural resources.

Ocampo also spoke of the challenges involved in transforming the current energy system into a system based on green energies, as “in every energy transition, one type of energy does not completely replace the previous one. Renewables will not substitute fossil fuels.”

This is due to the exorbitant quantity of oil that is used every day – some 90 million barrels – and to the fact that the world remains dependent on fossil fuels for roughly 80 percent of its energy, the expert said.

According to Ocampo, replacing these enormous quantities of energy with solar and wind power is an enormous challenge.

The researcher mentioned Germany as one of the countries that is leading the renewable energy transition, having set as a goal in the year 2000 to have renewables represent 18 percent of its energy consumption by 2020.

However, only 13 percent of Germany’s energy is currently from renewable sources, Ocampo said.

According to the scientist, the renewable energy potential – from water, wind, solar, and geothermic sources – in Mexico would be 383 terawatt-hours per year, meaning that an additional 600 terawatt-hours would be needed.

 

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