|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Oil, Mining & Energy (Click here for more)

Libya’s Oil Port Sidra Resumes Activity after Militia Assault

TRIPOLI – One of the most important oil ports in Libya on Saturday opened again after it had been under attack from an Islamist militia earlier in the month.

Sidra, normally held by the United Nations-backed government of Marshal Khalifa Haftar, had on March 3 been attacked by the Benghazi Defense Brigades.

It took Haftar’s forces nearly 12 days of clashes to repel the attack and take back full control over the port.

The “Demetrius,” a Greece-flagged ship, arrived at the port on Saturday and loaded some 630,000 barrels of oil that are to be transported to China, according to a Libyan official.

The Libyan National Oil Corporation announced a few days ago that both Sidra and the neighboring port of Ras Lanuf had regained their pre-assault production capacity of nearly 700,000 barrels a day.

However, their capacity is still 50 percent lower than the amount of barrels that had been produced by Libya before the revolution, which toppled former president Muammar al-Gaddafi in 2011.

Since then, Libya has been a scene of chaos and civil war, as three governments in the east, west and south of the country vie for power and control over the oil supply, aided by several dozen militias.

The situation has been exploited by mafias trafficking weapons, drugs, oil and even people.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved