|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Leaning Tower of Pisa Defies Name, Looses Tilt

ROME – The leaning tower of Pisa is now less bent than it was before thanks to engineering work implemented 17 years ago to reinforce the structure, a geo-technician working with the building’s surveillance group told EFE on Thursday.

The emblematic Italian landmark in the city of Pisa (central Italy) has lost four centimeters (1.5 inches) of tilt after it underwent engineering works and is straighter than it was before, meaning many future generations will potentially carry on enjoying the bendy building.

Nunziante Squeglia, geo-technics professor at the University of Pisa and member of the building’s surveillance group, told EFE that the tower appears to be straightening between 1 and 2 millimeters a year on average.

The most important consequence of the engineering work is that the building has become much more stable than the surveillance group could have hoped for.

Squeglia also assured EFE the iconic tower would not fully straighten and that based on the figures, it would need over two centuries to become upright.

The Pisa tower is monitored hourly through data that surveillance instruments send to computers in order to keep track of oscillations and vibrations caused by possible earth tremors.

In 1993 experts decided the tower would need reinforcement due to the massive difference in angle between the top and bottom which was putting the building at risk of tumbling.

The Tower of Pisa is a freestanding bell tower of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved