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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Art Installation Depicting Plight of Refugees to Be Shown at UK Cathedral

CANTERBURY, United Kingdom – A British artist was on Thursday putting the finishing touches to an installation made up of hundreds of items of discarded clothing that belonged to refugees ahead of its unveiling at a cathedral in southeastern England.

Visitors to Canterbury Cathedral would from Friday be able to marvel at the artwork entitled “Suspended” by Arabella Dorman, fashioned from clothes mostly recovered from beaches on the Greek island of Lesbos and makeshift refugee camps in the northern French port city of Calais, according to a statement on the cathedral’s website.

“My interest lies in the men, women and children behind the headlines, the individual stories behind the politics,” said Dorman. “I attempt to illuminate and to reveal the human face of conflict.”

Epa images showed the artist perched atop a stepladder as she made adjustments to her piece.

The bundle of clothes hangs about 3 meters (9.8 feet) above the ground and is illuminated from the center.

“As the installation brightens, it represents the light of hope by which a refugee is carried forwards,” said a statement. “As it dims, it seeks to remind the viewer that refugees may be left unseen and in darkness if their situation is forgotten.”

The piece, which was exhibited at Saint James’s Church in London’s Piccadilly at the end of 2017, was declared the “most talked about contemporary artwork” by the New York Times in an article published on Dec. 22, the statement pointed out.

“Suspended” will be on display in Canterbury between Feb. 23 and May 16.

According to the latest data from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 9,701 people have arrived to Greece, Italy and Spain so far this year, while 382 were declared either dead or missing.

 

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