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  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

UK Police: Death of Cranberries Lead Singer Dolores O’Riordan Not Suspicious

DUBLIN – The death of Dolores O’Riordan, the 46-year-old iconic lead singer of the rock band The Cranberries, was ruled not suspicious on Tuesday by United Kingdom police.

O’Riordan was on Monday found dead in her hotel room in the center of London, where she was getting ready to take part in a brief recording session.

“The death is not being treated as suspicious,” London’s Metropolitan Police said in a statement. “A report will be compiled for the coroner,” it added.

O’Riordan was born in Ballybricken, County Limerick, Ireland and her warm, western Irish accent (known as brogue) while singing remained a distinguishing feature, helping propel her band to fame in 1994.

The band’s first singles “Dream” and “Linger” and the full-length album “Everybody Else is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?” failed to gain much attention upon their initial release in 1992, but after being played extensively by MTV, were re-issued and peaked on the UK charts.

Their second album, “No Need to Argue” included the award-winning “Zombie,” a harder grunge song about a bombing by the Irish Republican Army that was seen by many as a raw expression of frustration and grief about a convulsed period in Irish history known as The Troubles.

The Cranberries recorded five albums with O’Riordan before they went on hiatus in 2003, the year before she launched her solo career.

The band reunited for a world tour in 2009 and again at the Special Olympics opening ceremony in Limerick in 2010.

A European tour started in 2016, but a second part, slated for 2017, was canceled due to back problems, according to O’Riordan.

She had discussed in interviews that she had suffered from an eating disorder when she was younger at had in 2015 been diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

After her death, tributes immediately poured in from music legends and Irish politicians alike, all mourning the loss of a singer whose unforgettable voice had been part of the soundtrack for many people’s lives across the globe.

She is survived by three children.

 

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