|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Business & Economy (Click here for more)

Japan Airlines Loses $3.4 Million in Email Fraud

TOKYO Japan Airlines lost 384 million yen ($3.4 million) when it failed to verify hoax emails and paid fees for leasing airplanes and other services into fraudulent accounts, the airline said on Thursday.

A JAL spokesperson told EFE that the airline received fake invoices and transferred payments toward aircraft leasing fees and cargo commissions into an unauthorized bank account in Hong Kong.

The Japanese Airlines leases a Boeing 777-300ER through a foreign financial firm, whose identity was stolen by unknown criminals to demand a payment of 360 million yen as leasing fee, which JAL deposited in the given account on Nov. 29.

Another company hired by JAL to manage its cargo division in the United States had made two payments on Aug. 27 and Sept. 7, worth 24 million yen, after receiving a similar email pretending to be from their logistics partner in the US, the spokesperson said.

JAL did not detect the fraud until it received email reminders about the payments, although the amounts were withdrawn from their account soon after the transactions, the company said.

The airline has asked Hong Kong authorities for help in tracing the payments but did not give more details to avoid interfering in the investigations by the Japanese police and the FBI.

The JAL employee who processed the fake emails did not doubt their authenticity because the emails were signed by the official they normally communicated with, state news agency NHK reported.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved